Posts Tagged ‘Mobiles’

Nokia is going full force into expanding their mobile mapping service by offering to buy US-based Navteq for a massive US$8.1billion. Navteq is a company which develops digital maps for the car industry, satellite navigation devices, internet-based mapping applications and solutions for the government and business markets.

Early this year, Nokia rolled out their mobile mapping service called Smart2go. I even have a post about the review of Smart2Go, which was done by a reader of mine, Hafiz Ismail.

Nokia Mobile Mapping Service

“The navigation area is a fast-growing business, and with location-based services expanding rapidly into mobile communications devices, the industry is poised for even further growth,” Nokia said in a statement.

The news of Nokia is acquiring Navteq proves to be one of the key steps to strengthen their leadership in mapping service for mobile phone. If the acquisition is successful, it aligns perfectly with Nokia’s vision to enable everyone to find their way to people, places and opportunities on mobile communications devices, cars, desktop computers and in all the other places that are important to them.

The research could lead to mobile devices that use transparent materials, repel dirt and fingerprints, and use solar energy to charge up.

Nokia and the University of Cambridge on Monday introduced a nanotechnology concept called Morph, which demonstrates how future mobile devices could be flexible enough to transform into different shapes.

Morph, jointly developed by the Nokia Research Center and the University of Cambridge, entails stretchable and flexible materials, transparent electronics, and self-cleaning surfaces that will give nanotechnology ultimate functionality, according to Nokia.

The concept uses a similar principle as spider silk, enabling elasticity in mobile devices so they could be transformed into different shapes to adjust to a specific task. It could involve a folded design to be used in a traditional mobile phone, or a larger unfolded design for displaying more information and involving keyboards and touch pads.

Morph could lead to mobile devices that use transparent materials, repel dirt and fingerprints, use solar energy to charge, and use integrated sensors to provide more information about the environment — an idea that Nokia introduced earlier with its Eco Sensor Concept that involves a wearable mobile phone and a sensing device that analyzes a person’s health and surrounding environment.

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Water-Powered Mobiles

Posted: March 5, 2008 in Mobiles
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Samsung Electro-Mechanics announced Thursday that it has developed a micro-fuel cell and hydrogen generator that runs on H2O.

“When the handset is turned on, metal and water in the phone react to produce hydrogen gas,” explained Oh Yong-soo, vice president of Samsung Electro-Mechanics’ research center. “The gas is then supplied to the fuel cell where it reacts with oxygen in the air to generate power.” Other fuel cells need methanol to produce hydrogen, while Samsung’s needs only water.

Since the micro-fuel cell can generate up to three watts of electricity, it could be used in mobile devices, the company said. The new fuel cell could power a handset for 10 hours, twice as long as rechargeable batteries.

“If the user uses the phone for four hours a day on average, they would have to change the hydrogen cartridge about every five days,” Oh said. “Later handsets will be developed that don’t need the hydrogen cartridges to be changed, and would only need to be filled with water.”

The water-powered cell phones are expected to enter the market by 2010. Samsung Electro-Mechanics unveiled the new technology at the 2007 Korea Electronics Show at the Korea International Exhibition Center in Ilsan, Gyeonggi Province.

So get ready for the water powered mobile phones, there might be a time in the future where you say my phone is running out of water instead of low battery! )

Scientists believe to have discovered a much more efficient way to use silicon to convert heat into electricity – for use in a variety of products ranging from cars to portable electronics.

The concept of converting waste heat into electricity isn’t exactly new, but it never really materialized due to efficiency hurdles. Now, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California at Berkeley think they may have found a key increase the conversion efficiency by a factor of 100.

Imagine a time in which you would not have to plug in your cellphone or iPod over night to recharge the battery. Instead you would power and charge a device simply by wearing it close to your body. Few months back there was an announcement by Samsung which hinted the possibility of water powered mobiles.

Read more here.

RIM BlackberryBlackberry dominates the corporate PDA market. However, Research in Motion (RIM) clearly wants more. Growing international momentum and retail push are driving the demand for Blackberry Curve as well as Blackberry Pearl, promising a good Christmas season for RIM.

Research in Motion (RIM) vice-president of customer accounts, Gregory Wade, spoke to Business Standard about how the company is planning to fight the challenges as rivals offer similar devices across price segments.

RIM recently shipped its 20 millionth Blackberry smart phone and the devices are ranked number one in the global PDA space with 18 per cent market share according to third party research.

We will also announce another 4-5 models in 2008 and all of them would be packed with consumer-friendly applications and design.

So, we can expect better models than already popular Blackberry models like Pearl, Curve etc